Manetos Puppy

£150
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Bromley, Kent
Member since Mar 2014

n/a n/a
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Key Advert Facts

Pet Type :
Dogs
Pet Breed :
Mixed Breed
Advertiser Type :
Private Seller
Pets Current Age :
2 years, 11 months old (More Info)

Full Advert Details

Here we have a Manetos puppy 5 months old. At the moment he is called Eddie but he is very clever & young enough to adapt to a name change. Born at home in a litter of 4.His Mum was abandoned in a building site for 6 months before she came to us. All puppies & Mum have been rehomed except this lovely little boy. He is cage trained & getting there with the house training but is still young so occansionally has an accident at night. He is very loving & enjoys a good play & also lots of cuddles. All vaccines have been given inc Rabies & he has his passport so can travel anywhere in europe with or for his new family. £150 - this is not for profit it is just a donation to contribute to all his vets bills & food & so we may continue to help other animals that need our help until they can find their forever home. I have included some information about his breed

The Ibizan Maneto: a strong loyal little dog;
In 2004 the Podenco Maneto was recognized as an indigenous race in Spain. There is no scientific evidence of how old the breed is, but there are several dogs that resemble Manetos depicted in photographs and paintings from the 19th century.
The breed originated in Andalusia in southern Spain; in particular, the regions around Cadiz and Malaga are considered the cradle of the birth of the Ibizan Maneto race.
The Maneto could simply be described as a Dachshund Podenco; weighing between 8.5 to 11.5 kg. The recognized colors are different shades of red and white. They have the characteristic large upright ears of a Podenco with the characteristic Dachshund legs. They are used for hunting rabbits like their cousin the Ibizan Andaluz. It is believed that the Ibizan Maneto emerged from the medium Podenco Andaluz.
The Maneto is an expert at hunting in dense brush, they are also used in narrow canyons; a are particularly suited for detecting and retrieving the prey, both on land and in water and are often combined with the Ibizan Andaluz during the hunt, as they can go where the bigger dogs cannot. Manetos also often work closer to the hunter than the Andaluz.
But Maneto is not just a hunting dog, they also have a reputation as very sweet family pets which adapt easily to family life. They also love being with their owner and keen for affection. They like to sleep in your bed and your feet warm during cold winter nights, and they will gladly do anything for you as long as they are rewarded with a tasty reward. This is a dog well suited to family life because they are very kind to their own families. Another major advantage of the Maneto their short legs as they cannot use whirling drumsticks come to your face while playing, like their older cousins often do! They are affectionate to their family, but may be reluctant and suspicious of strangers; however their natural curiosity and openness prevails after a while.
It is a very independent and intelligent dog, with a strong temperament and character and probably see themselves as superior to other dogs, therefore it is important to socialise the Maneto with many different breeds.
If you are looking for a loyal friendly dog, then the Maneto is the perfect temperament for you.
He is very effective for hunting birds, especially partridge and quail, and the collection of ducks on the water, he is one of the most important collectors of small game in all mountain areas and areas with dense vegetation and shrubs.
All in all, the Podenco Maneto makes a very good family pet, very intelligent with a good memory, loyal, well balanced and affectionate. Give them a chance.

Puppy/Dog Adoption Checklist

Before contacting or visiting the advertiser for this Mixed Breed. Please make sure you have printed and read this checklist fully. Do NOT buy a dog or puppy from the advertiser unless you are happy that they follow all the advice on the list. If you have any concerns, report them to us.


  • Do your research first
    Getting a new dog or puppy is a massive commitment, so make sure you have researched the breed fully and have the time and commitment necessary to care for the dog. You can read our detailed Information guide about dogs for potential new dog owners.
  • Confirm that the advertiser is genuine
    You should verify this by arranging to visit the dog or puppy at the advertisers home, if they make excuses or try to ask for money or a deposit without seeing the dog, or if the advertiser attempts to deliver the puppies or meet you at any other location than their own home, then please do not agree to this. NEVER send money online for any dog. Please read our article on avoiding potential scams.
    If you are unsure that the advertiser is genuine, please report them to us.
  • Can the puppies be viewed with their Mother?
    The advertiser should ALWAYS let you see the puppies with their mother, and in certain circumstances should let you see the puppies father. Not being able to see the puppies mother is a sign the puppies have not been bred by the advertiser and possibly imported. If the advertiser makes excuses why you cannot see the puppies mum, please walk away and report them to us
  • Is the Puppy over 8 Weeks of age?
    Puppies must be at least 8 weeks old and fully weaned before they can leave their mothers. Most responsible sellers will keep their puppies longer than this before they let them go to new homes. Read further information on the minimum age puppies should be before leaving their mothers
  • Check the Health of the Puppy or Dog
    It can be difficult for the average person to check if a dog or puppy is healthy or not, so if you decide to adopt or buy the puppy, make sure that the seller agrees that you can return them within 48 hours for a full refund after taking the dog or puppy to a Vet of your choice for a health check. The seller should be willing to let you do this. If the puppy has already been health checked by their own vet, make sure you get evidence for this in the form of vet records and phone their vet to confirm this.
  • Is the puppy or dog up to date with their vaccinations?
    Puppies should receive 2 vaccinations, the first at around 8 to 10 weeks of age and the second, two weeks later at around 10 to 12 weeks of age. Older Dogs require booster vaccinations occasionally as recommended by their Vet. Ask the breeder which vaccinations they have had and if not, why not. Puppies should have at least had their first set of vaccinations before they leave. If the seller has not started the puppies vaccinations, it will be your responsibility to make sure you arrange both vaccinations 7 days before letting your puppy go outside. (More Info)
  • Have the puppies been treated for worms and fleas?
    Puppies should really be wormed at around 2 weeks of age, and again at around 5 weeks of age, and finally just before they leave the seller/breeder at 8 to 12 weeks of age.
  • Is the puppy/dog Microchipped ?
    From April 6th 2016 it will be required by law that all dog over 8 weeks of age are microchipped and that the keepers details registered against them are kept up to date. The breeder is responsible for microchipping the puppies and must have their details registered on the microchip database first. Please check to make sure you receive the microchip documentation with chip number and then arrange to transfer the microchip in to your own name. (More Info)
  • Ask questions about puppies mother
    Ask how many litters the mother has had and how old she is, she should be at least 1.5 years old. Ask about her temperament. The advertiser should want to tell you all about the puppies mother.
  • Is the dog/puppy registered with the kennel club?
    If they are, then check to make sure you are given the correct kennel club documents BEFORE you decide to take the dog home. It may also be worth phoning the kennel club to check the information provided is correct.
  • Have the puppies been socialised ?
    Make sure that puppies have been socialised from a very early age and are raised in a home environment, have interacted with their litter mates and are used to people, children and general household life. Puppies that haven't been raised in a home environment may develop behavioural issues, have temperamental problems, be difficult to housetrain and find adjusting to family life hard.

Please read visit our Pet Advice section for further information before adopting a dog or puppy. Here are a few very useful articles you should read first :

1) A Beginners Guide to Adopting a Dog
2) 10 Things You Need To Consider Before Getting a Puppy
3) All About Dog Rescue Centres
4) Why adopt an older dog ?
5) Could you offer a new home to a pedigree dog ?

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