Pets4homes Announce The Most Popular Gun Dog Breeds In The Uk

Gun dogs are a group of dogs from various different breeds that were all historically used to assist hunters and shooters to find, flush out, or retrieve prey – or perform a variety of associated roles depending on their particular skills and talents.

Shooting parties with gun dogs can still be found across many rural areas of the UK even today, and there are many popular gun dog breeds that are still widely used in working roles all over the country – however, most dogs with gun dog origins today are kept as domestic pets and companions.

Many gun dog breeds are very versatile and adaptive, which helps them to make the transition to life as pets, and gun dogs of different breeds can be found in a range of different sizes and with different core traits, which offers a lot of variety for prospective puppy buyers.

However, not everyone knows which dog breeds and types are counted as gun dogs and that may have had working origins, and there are in fact a total of 31 different gun dog breeds listed on Pets4Homes at any one time, which is many more than a lot of people expect!

Certain gun dog breeds are of course much more popular in the UK than others, and this tends to be the breeds that have been established the longest here and that most dog owners recognise immediately. That said, over the course of the last couple of decades, a lot of gun dog breeds that were virtually unheard of in the UK previously have begun to gain traction and popularity, as word of them spreads and interest in the breeds in question increases.

If you are trying to choose a gun dog breed or wish to learn more about gun dogs as a whole with a view to finding the perfect pet for you, knowing what type of gun dogs are particularly popular and why can be very helpful.

As Pets4Homes is the biggest and busiest pet classifieds website in the UK, hosting more adverts for dogs for sale than any other portal, we are in the unique position of being able to identify and share the most popular gun dog breeds in the UK, and tell you why they have such enduring appeal with dog lovers of all types.

In this article, we will announce the ten most popular gun dog breeds in the UK in reverse order, along with some general information on the breeds in question, the reasons for their appeal, and how much they cost to buy.

Read on to learn more about the most popular gun dog breeds in the UK today.

What is a gun dog?

A gun dog is a breed of dog that was historically bred and used for a specific type of working role, to assist shooters taking part in hunting and gun sport pursuing live prey.

Different gun dog breeds each have slightly different skill sets, which might involve flushing out game birds, “pointing” to alert handlers of the location of prey, or retrieving downed prey over land and/or water.

Each individual gun dog breed has its own unique skillset, which within a domestic home, still manifests as specific personality and behaviour traits that indicate the breed’s working history.

Many gun dogs have a real affinity for water and love to swim, and gun dogs as a whole tend to be outgoing, energetic, clever and tenacious, and keen to have a job to do and a role to fulfil.

The term “gun dog” is also the name of one of the Kennel Club’s larger grouping that encompass a collection of different individual dog breeds sharing a similar origin or trait, in this case, that of working with shooting hunters.

Whilst some of the breeds that are classed as gun dogs today are only rarely used now for working roles, all of them have a strong working history – and some can still be found working with hunters right up until the present day.

Even amongst the dog breeds that are most widely used in modern times for working gun dog roles, the majority of those dogs owned in the UK are kept solely or largely as pets, and many of them are hugely popular across the board, as well as high up in the most popular gun dog rankings.

How did we determine the popularity of our listed gun dog breeds?

Before we get to our list of the ten most popular gun dog breeds in the UK, first of all we’ll explain how we determined the rankings.

Our figures for the UK’s most popular gun dog breeds are based on advertisement statistics for dogs offered for sale here on Pets4Homes throughout the whole of 2018, the most recent year that we have a complete set of data for.

This doesn’t of course include any information on gun dog breeds offered for sale on other portals, but as the biggest and busiest pets classifieds website in the UK, the information that Pets4Homes collates on advertisement data reflects an accurate, up-to-date snapshot of the market that is reflected across the UK as a whole.

We have calculated the most popular gun dog breed rankings based on the number of advertisements for individual dogs and litters of gun dogs offered for sale in 2018 on Pets4Homes.

As many dog breeders list whole litters for sale within one advert rather than listing each puppy individually, the listing numbers provided is based on the total number of adverts here rather than the exact number of dogs, and so the exact population figure for each breed is likely to be a little higher than the number of adverts.

The information we will provide on the top ten gun dog breeds in the UK includes their popularity in the rankings of all gun dog breeds advertised on Pets4Homes, as well as their latest prices and some insights into the reasons behind their popularity here in the UK.

So without further ado, here are the ten most popular gun dog breeds in the UK based on 2018 advertisement data collated by Pets4Homes, and listed in reverse order.

Number 10: The American Cocker Spaniel

Most of us in the UK could recognise a cocker spaniel on sight, and most dog lovers know that cockers are a type of gun dog. However, the (English) cocker spaniel that most of us are very familiar with isn’t the only cocker spaniel breed out there, and a close relative of our English cocker spaniel is their stateside cousin; the American cocker spaniel. You can read more about the differences between English and American cocker spaniels here.

  • The American cocker spaniel is much less common than the English cocker, but they are still the 10th most popular gun dog breed in the UK based on our 2018 advert figures.
  • In 2018, a total of 134 American cocker spaniel dogs and litters were advertised here on Pets4Homes.
  • The average advertised price of American cocker spaniels on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £792.
  • The total number of pedigree American cocker spaniels and litters advertised in 2018 was 57, and these pedigree American cockers attracted an average price of £803.
  • The remaining 77 dogs advertised here in 2018 were non-pedigrees or unregistered dogs of the breed, which were advertised for an average price of £783 per dog.

As you can see, more non-pedigree American cocker spaniels were offered for sale in 2018 than pedigrees, and there is only a difference of £20 between the average price charged for pedigree dogs of the breed versus non-pedigrees.

This may indicate that the dog’s pedigree status is not overly important for buyers of dogs of the breed, but equally, it may simply reflect the possibility that the level of demand for American cockers spaniels in the UK is higher than the available supply, meaning that not everyone who would wish to buy a pedigree dog of the breed out of choice is able to find one for sale at the right time, and this could serve to keep the prices of non-pedigree American cockers comparatively high.

The American cocker spaniel is a medium-sized dog breed from the Kennel Club’s gun dog group, and which is recognised as a separate breed in its own right from the English cocker.

American cockers have a lot to recommend them to people seeking a gun dog breed as a pet, but like many dog breeds with working origins, they do require their owners to take the breed’s working traits and personality into account and provide an appropriate lifestyle to meet the dog’s needs.

American cocker spaniels are very energetic dogs that are also really smart, and they need a lot of exercise and mental stimulation each day to keep them happy and fulfilled.

They’re really good with children as a general rule and so make for excellent pets for active families, and as long as all of their needs are met and they get plenty of exercise, are generally happy being left at home alone for a few hours at a time without becoming bored or destructive.

However, the coat of the American cocker spaniel is long and thick, and requires a lot of brushing and grooming to keep it in good condition, which means that the breed is not a good fit for everyone. They also tend to shed quite a lot of fur too, which can make keeping on top of this within the home a challenge.

American cocker spaniels have an average lifespan of around 12-15 years which reflects their robust natures and tendency to good health, although there are a few hereditary health conditions that can be found within the breed too, and which can affect the quality of life and longevity of individual dogs of the breed.

Number 9: The German Wirehaired Pointer

The German wirehaired pointer is of course a pointing dog breed, which means one that has been bred and developed to “point” for prey, seeking it out and using a distinctive “pointing” body stance and potentially, vocalisations to let hunters know where their target is.

Pointer breeds tend to share a fairly similar body shape and build that is very well-balanced and nice looking, and the German wirehaired pointer is no exception.

  • The German wirehaired pointer is the 9th most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on Pets4Homes advert numbers from 2018.
  • In 2018, a total of 157 German wirehaired pointer dogs and litters were advertised for sale here on Pets4Homes.
  • The average advertised price for German wirehaired pointers listed on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £683.
  • Of the total, 85 adverts were for Kennel Club registered pedigree German wirehaired pointers, which were offered for sale for an average price of £745 per dog.
  • The remaining 72 dogs and litters offered for sale were non-pedigree or unregistered German wirehaired pointers, which were advertised for an average price of £609 per dog.

Even though the German wirehaired pointer is the 9th most popular gun dog breed in the UK at the moment, like the American cocker spaniel, the total number of dogs of the breed offered for sale in 2018 is still comparatively low. Almost as many non-pedigree dogs of the breed were offered for sale as pedigrees during this time, although there is more of a price disparity between pedigrees and non-pedigrees than there is within the previous dog breed listed, the American cocker spaniel.

German wirehaired pointers are large, rangy and very outgoing dogs, which retain a strong incentive to work and need to have a task to concentrate on. They’re highly energetic as well as very intelligent, and they need a lot of exercise, mental stimulation, and things to do to keep them happy and fulfilled, and prevent them from becoming destructive within the home.

Again, German wirehaired pointers are reputed to be very good with children, and they are low-maintenance in the grooming stakes, and don’t shed very much fur either.

This means that there’s a lot to recommend the German wirehaired pointer to families and many other types of dog owners too, but as a large dog that needs a lot of exercise as well as space, they don’t usually thrive within a sedentary or very small home.

Whilst dogs of the breed love to work and actively enjoy training, their high intelligence can make them somewhat challenging to train, because the dog thinks so quickly and may learn a lot through observation, sometimes even seeming to predict what you will do next before you even know it yourself!

German wirehaired pointers have an average lifespan of between around 9-12 twelve years of age. The higher end of the age spectrum reflects a good average for dog breeds of a similar size, but is rather lower than the norm at the lower end, reflecting a number of hereditary health issues that can be found in some German wirehaired pointer breed lines.

Additionally, the German wirehaired pointer is one dog breed for which the Kennel Club mandates pre-breeding health screening for Von Willebrand’s disease in parent dogs in order for their litters to be eligible for pedigree registration. The necessity for this test may go some way towards explaining why there are almost as many non-pedigree German wirehaired pointers offered for sale as pedigrees, as even if a dog has a full proven pedigree ancestry, if their parents were not screened for Von Willebrand’s disease they may inherit it themselves and so, be ineligible for registration.

By no means all or even most non-pedigree German wirehaired pointers are bred to circumvent the need for testing, and just because a dog or their parents is untested does not mean that they will have inherited the condition.

However, if you are considering buying an unregistered or non-pedigree German wirehaired pointer, bear this in mind and find out about the health and status of the pup’s parents and other relatives, and ensure that you understand the additional risks involved in choosing a puppy from untested stock.

Number 8: The Pointer

The pointer is of course another pointing dog breed, and perhaps the best-known of them all. Like the German wirehaired pointer, this is a breed that has a long working history working alongside of shooters hunting game birds and other types of prey.

The pointer is sometimes also known as the English pointer, particularly outside of the UK, and they are lean, handsome dogs with a very typical pointer conformation.

  • The pointer or English pointer is the 8th most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on our advert figures on Pets4Homes from 2018.
  • During 2018, a total of 168 pointer dogs and pointer litters were offered for sale here on Pets4Homes.
  • The average price listed within adverts for pointers placed on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £728.
  • Out of the 168 pointer adverts placed in total, 119 of these were Kennel Club registered pedigrees. These pedigree dogs of the breed attracted an average advertised price of £797 each.
  • The remaining 49 dogs and litters within the total reflect non-pedigree or unregistered pointer dogs, which attracted an average advertised price of £560 per dog.

Again, given the pointer’s 8th place ranking out of 31 different gun dog breeds advertised here in total, 168 dogs of the breed offered for sale over the course of the last year is still not a very large number.

However, the split between the number of pedigrees and non-pedigrees is greater than for either of the other two breeds we’ve covered so far, which is more in line with the norms for other pedigree dog breeds. This also reflects the fact that the pointer is a very well established and well known dog breed in the UK, and one within which finding a pedigree dog of the breed for sale is relatively straightforward.

The price disparity between the advertised cost of pedigree versus non-pedigree pointers too reflects a preference for pedigrees amongst most puppy buyers, with over £200 difference in average prices, resulting in a clear split in the price bands within the breed.

Pointers are medium-sized dogs that once more, have the same high intelligence and high energy levels of the other breeds we’ve mentioned, and that are again notable for being a good choice of dog for families with children.

They don’t need a lot of grooming and don’t shed fur very heavily which makes them low maintenance on the coat care front, but they are lively, excitable and outgoing dogs than need almost continual entertainment or something to do, and they are very intolerant of being left on their own for very long at a time.

They form strong bonds with their families and often with children in particular, but they also have a reputation for being a little gung-ho and not overly careful about their movements, which means that pointers can be rather clumsy or careless about knocking things – and smaller family members – over!

Even though the pointer is a British dog breed and home-grown gun dog favourite, they’re not the most popular pointing gun dog breed overall here, and this is not the last pointer that you will find within our list.

However, the pointer is medium sized rather than large like many other gun dog breeds, which does mean that they don’t need a huge home in order to be comfortable, assuming that it is large enough for the dog to be able to move around freely and they get to spend plenty of time outside.

Pointers have an average lifespan of around 12-14 years of age, which is within the normal to good range for a dog of this size. There is, however, quite a long list of hereditary health issues that can be found within some dogs of the pointer breed, although most dogs of the breed tend to be healthy and robust. Whilst there are no mandated health testing schemes in place for dogs of the pointer breed, breeders are advised to undertake hip scoring and eye testing for progressive retinal atrophy in breeding stock, as well as DNA testing for hereditary epilepsy.

Number 7: The German Shorthaired Pointer

A close relative of the 10th placed dog (the German wirehaired pointer), the 7th most popular gun dog breed in the UK at the time of writing is the German shorthaired pointer. This is also the third German gun dog breed to make it into the top ten popularity rankings, and the fourth pointer breed.

German shorthaired pointers are medium-sized pointing gun dogs, which makes them a good size for many homes, including those that may not have the room to accommodate a larger gun dog breed.

  • The German shorthaired pointer is the 7th most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on the number of adverts placed here for dogs of the breed in 2018.
  • During 2018, Pets4Homes hosted adverts for a total of 413 individual dogs and litters of the German shorthaired pointer breed.
  • The average asking price for German shorthaired pointers offered for sale on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £777 per dog.
  • Of the 413 German shorthaired pointer dogs and litters advertised on Pets4Homes in 2018, 267 of these were Kennel Club registered pedigrees. These pedigree dogs attracted an average asking price of £825 each.
  • The remaining 146 dogs completing the total were non-pedigree or unregistered German shorthaired pointers. Non-pedigree dogs of the breed advertised here in 2018 were showcased with an average asking price of £690 per dog.

There’s a big jump in advert numbers between the 8th placed pointer and the 7th placed German shorthaired pointer, and a much larger population of German shorthaired pointers in the UK in total. This is a breed that has long been established in the UK, and one that is in significant demand amongst people seeking to buy a dog of a pointing gun dog breed.

German shorthaired pointers are very similar to their wirehaired relatives, with the coat type being the most distinctive difference, in this case being short, smooth, and very low maintenance to care for. However, German shorthaired pointers are very heavy shedders, and so cause a lot of hoovering when kept within the home!

What makes the German shorthaired pointer so popular in the UK? Let’s look at their good and bad points.

When it comes to walks and exercise, German shorthaired pointers are very active and outdoors-y dogs that need several hours of exercise each day. This means that they’re not a good fit for all owners, but a great choice for active families that like to spend a lot of time outdoors.

Again, they are really smart dogs that can often work things out for themselves through observation, and they are very receptive to training and love to learn new skills and commands. However, they retain a very puppy-like personality through to around their second birthdays, and so achieving a full range of commands and particularly, higher level commands requires time and an experienced trainer.

This is also a breed that needs company for the main part of the day, and they are very intolerant of being left alone without something to do, and may suffer from separation anxiety or become destructive within the home if ignored for too long.

Dogs of the breed are loyal but generally very personable, and get on well with both other dogs and people. They are very social and like to make new friends, and can usually be found in the thick of any pack playing together in the dog park.

In terms of the breed’s health, the average lifespan of a German shorthaired pointer is around 12-14 years, which is a good average longevity for a pedigree dog breed of this sort of size.

As is the case for most pedigree gun dog breeds (and most dog breeds in general) there are a range of German shorthaired pointer hereditary health problems that can be found within some bloodlines and breed populations, most notably hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia respectively. German shorthaired pointer breeders are encouraged to have their parent stock hip and elbow scored prior to breeding, and to remove any dogs from the breeding scheme whose scores don’t reflect an improvement over that of the breed’s averages.

If you are considering buying a German shorthaired pointer, talk to the breeder about the health testing protocols they have in place for their parent stock, and find out the hip and elbow scores achieved by the litter’s parents before committing to a purchase.

Number 6: The Weimaraner

The Weimaraner is yet another pointing dog breed to make it into the list of the UK’s favourite 10 gun dog breeds, which goes to show the level of popularity that pointers as a whole enjoy here. Originating from Germany, the Weimaraner has been a popular dog breed in the UK for many years now, and they have a well-established presence in the UK.

Weimaraners are undeniably handsome and distinctive-looking large dogs thanks in large part to their beautiful glossy steely or silvery grey coats, noble conformation and good looks.

  • The Weimaraner is the 6th most popular gun dog breed in the UK according to the number of adverts for dogs of the breed placed on Pets4Homes in 2018.
  • In 2018, a total of 424 Weimaraner dogs and litters were advertised for sale on Pets4Homes.
  • The average advertised price per dog for all Weimaraners listed on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £853.
  • Of the 424 Weimaraner dogs and litters offered for sale here in 2018, 293 were Kennel Club registered pedigrees. These pedigree Weimaraners were advertised for an average price of £907 per dog.
  • The remaining 131 adverts for Weimaraners for sale on Pets4Homes in 2018 were non-pedigree or unregistered dogs of the breed, which were advertised at an average price of £731 per dog.

Over twice as many pedigree dogs of the breed were showcased for sale here in 2018 than non-pedigrees, and the price gap between pedigrees and non-pedigrees is within the usual sort of range one might expect. Weimaraners are quite expensive to buy, particularly for pedigree examples, but even non-pedigrees commonly change hands for around the same kind of money or even more in some cases as other pedigree dog breeds of a similar size.

So, what makes the Weimaraner so popular? First of all, the breed’s distinctive good looks have a large part to play in catching the attention of prospective buyers, and the glowing grey coat is perhaps these dogs’ most distinctive feature. A nice, balanced and lean conformation helps too.

It is the Weimaraner personality itself that helps to win over fans, perhaps even more so than their good looks – Weimaraners tend to be very loving and loyal, keen to please, and always look to their handlers and the people they trust for direction. They form strong bonds with their families and are even better with children than most other gun dog breeds, most of which tend to be great family pets.

As a large dog breed, not everyone who might aspire to owning a Weimaraner has the room to accommodate one, and this is another breed that doesn’t thrive if left alone at home for long periods of time; they really need plenty of company and can suffer from separation anxiety if left for too long.

Weimaraners are very challenging to provide with enough exercise too, and these large, rangy dogs love to run, and have bundles of energy. They’re also really smart, and so need exercise that engages their brains as well as letting them blow off steam.

Because Weimaraners are so smart, they can be very rewarding to train and can learn and exhibit a wide range of different commands with the right instruction. However, they are often considered to be a poor choice of pet for the first-time dog owner or people who have not trained a dog before, as they will often be one step ahead and teaching themselves new things even when you’re not actively training them.

The average lifespan of Weimaraners is 11-14 years, which is around the average for a dog breed of this size. However, there is a large and diverse list of hereditary health problems that can be found within the breed as a whole in the UK, and breeders are strongly encouraged to have parent stock health tested for conditions on the list where such a test is available – particularly for hip dysplasia, undertaken by hip scoring parent dogs.

Number 5: The Hungarian Vizsla

In fifth place is yet another pointing dog breed – the Hungarian vizsla, the fifth pointing breed to make it into the UK’s top ten gun dogs list, and the last one too.

Up until around a decade ago, the Hungarian vizsla dog breed was not one that was widely seen or known of within the UK, but they have achieved a significant following and high level of popularity in the last decade or so, making these gun dogs much in demand as pets amongst UK pet buyers.

  • The Hungarian vizsla is the 5th most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on the number of Hungarian vizsla dogs and litters offered for sale here in 2018.
  • During 2018, Pets4Homes hosted a total of 693 adverts for Hungarian vizsla dogs and litters for sale in the UK.
  • The average asking price for Hungarian vizslas in 2018 was £937 per dog.
  • Out of the 693 Hungarian vizsla adverts posted here in 2018, 480 were Kennel Club registered pedigree dogs, which were advertised at an average cost of £1,008 each.
  • The remaining 213 Vizslas adverts on Pets4Homes in 2018 were for non-pedigree or unregistered dogs of the breed, which were advertised at an average asking price of £776 each.

Hungarian vizslas are large dogs of the pointing type, which are still widely used for gun sport in their native Hungary, as well as being used within roles of this type to some extent within the UK too as their popularity has increased. However, the vizsla really took off in the UK as a pet rather than a working dog, and now they are in great demand among puppy buyers.

The Hungarian vizsla is a very nice looking dog with a lean, balanced pointer conformation and long muzzle, and a beautiful short chestnut-coloured coat that really makes them stand out and is very handsome and unusual.

Like many gun dog breeds, Hungarian vizslas need a lot of company and entertainment, and compared to most breeds as a whole, don’t tolerate being left alone for long and need company with them most of the day. However, they are not as intolerant of their own company as some other gun dog breeds, and when properly trained and managed, can usually be left on their own for a few hours in between walks.

In terms of the breed’s energy levels, they are once again very high, and dogs of the breed need a significant amount of exercise every day. Hungarian vizslas also need plenty of mental stimulation too, and they like games, having a job to do, and play and entertainment that makes them think and work things out.

This is a breed that is very loyal and loving, and they are highly affectionate with their families. They also tend to be friendly, social dogs that get on well with other dogs and people, and that generally display nice manners.

Training a Hungarian vizsla can be easy and intuitive when undertaken by someone who is experienced with the breed or similar smart working dog breeds, but again, they can be a bit of a handful for inexperienced trainers as dogs of the breed are so smart.

One downside of the Hungarian vizsla breed is the overall health of the breed in the UK – it is rather below the norm on average, and there are a large number of hereditary health conditions that can be found within the UK breed population. Hungarian vizsla breeders are strongly encouraged to test their dogs for their hip scores, and also undertake testing for idiopathic epilepsy and cerebellar ataxia.

The cost of undertaking the relevant health tests helps to contribute to the rather high purchase prices commanded by pedigree dogs of the breed, and if you are considering buying either a pedigree or a non-pedigree Hungarian vizsla, you should do plenty of research into the breed’s overall health first, and ask the breeders you visit about health tests that they have undertaken on their parent stock.

Number 4: The Golden Retriever

The golden retriever is a large dog breed that is hugely popular and well known, and that really needs no introduction. Golden retrievers are one of the most versatile dog breeds around, and they have long been used for a huge variety of different working roles.

Today, the breed’s best-known and potentially most widely used working role is as assistance dogs for the blind and deaf, and they are also used as therapy dogs and detection dogs in other applications too. However, the golden retriever’s origins are as a gun dog first and foremost, and this is an excellent retrieving breed that really loves the water.

  • The golden retriever is the 4th most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on the number of adverts for dogs and litters placed on Pets4Homes in 2018.
  • During 2018, there were a total of 1,656 golden retriever dogs and litters advertised for sale on Pets4Homes.
  • The average asking price for each golden retriever advertised here in 2018 was £908.
  • Out of the 1,656 total golden retriever adverts placed in 2018, 753 were Kennel Club registered pedigrees. These were offered for sale at an average price of £1,013 per dog.
  • The remaining 903 adverts within the total were for non-pedigree or unregistered golden retrievers and litters, which were offered for sale at an average cost of £820 per dog.

Looking at the advert figures from 2018, there were actually more non-pedigree golden retrievers advertised here than pedigrees. With almost £200 difference between the average cost of a pedigree and a non-pedigree dog of the breed, this will certainly factor into the decision for many buyers, but given the relatively high cost of the breed on average, this is unlikely to provide a huge incentive for most to consider a non-pedigree dog in and of itself.

Dog breeds that are present in large population numbers and that are in great demand often see almost as many or even more adverts for non-pedigree dogs as pedigrees, as the main demand comes from those looking for pets and companions rather than dogs to breed from or show.

Additionally, people who are seeking dogs for specialist working roles too choose based on the right traits, which can often be found in non-pedigree dogs just as much as pedigrees.

Golden retrievers are large and well-built dogs, which have amazing personalities and bags of character. The same combination of personality traits that helped to make the golden retriever a great retrieving gun dog have also helped to see the breed establish itself in many other roles too, such as the aforementioned assistance dog tasks and other applications. They also help to ensure that the golden retriever is one of our best-loved large dog breeds overall, as well as one of the most popular gun dogs.

There are masses of good things about golden retrievers that helps them to suit so many different working roles as well as life as pets, but they are not a good choice of pet for all domestic homes. Golden retrievers are not only tall but large in general, and they need plenty of space to move around, and access to a garden in between walks.

The golden retriever coat is of course beautiful and distinctive, but it sheds hair prolifically all year round, and needs lots of brushing and grooming.

Golden retrievers also have very high energy levels and need lots of exercise, both to keep them happy and fulfilled and to keep them from gaining weight. This is one breed that is very food-oriented, and they never miss a chance to eat if they think they can get away with it!

Whilst the golden retriever breed is not one to choose lightly and they require the right type of home and management in order to thrive, this is such an adaptive and personable breed that they’re a great fit for a wide variety of different owners.

The breed loves retrieving and games that involve retrieving, and they’re equally a home on land or in the water, so make for very rewarding companions for families with children and those that spend a lot of time outdoors with their dogs. The breed is also really intelligent, a must for working roles, and they can learn a wide range of different skills and commands.

The average life expectancy for dogs of the breed is 10-12 years, and as is the case for most breeds, there are some hereditary health issues associated with golden retrievers that prospective puppy buyers should investigate in detail before committing to a purchase.

Number 3: The English Springer Spaniel

The English springer spaniel is one of our homegrown favourites, and a versatile and highly skilled retrieving dog breed that is one of the breeds most commonly used as a gun sport retriever right up until the present day. However, the vast majority of Springers in the UK today are kept as pets and companions rather than as working dogs.

  • The English springer spaniel is the 3rd most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on the total number of adverts for Springer dogs and litters advertised on Pets4Homes in 2018.
  • In 2018, there were a total of 2,811 English springer spaniel for sale adverts placed on Pets4Homes.
  • The average advertised price for English springer spaniels in 2018 was £553 per dog.
  • Of the 2,811 English springer spaniel dogs and litters advertised in 2018, 1,363 of them were Kennel Club registered pedigrees. These were advertised for an average asking price of £611 each.
  • The remaining 1,448 English springer adverts in 2018 were for non-pedigree or unregistered dogs and litters, which were offered for sale at an average cost of £499 each.

English springer spaniels are quite economical to buy even when it comes to pedigree dogs of the breed, which reflects the large population of springers in the UK and their general popularity. Again, this is a breed where there are more non-pedigree dogs for sale on average than pedigrees, although the split is very close to 50-50.

Again, demand for English springers as pets means that pedigree status is not hugely important to many buyers, and for working roles, some people actively choose non-pedigrees, or don’t assign a lot of value to pedigree paperwork. Working lines of dogs sometimes differ in terms of their physical appearance from the show dog’s breed standard, and many Springer enthusiasts feel that working lines are superior and have better gun dog traits than those bred for showing and professional breeding.

As a medium sized dog breed, the English springer spaniel can fit into homes of most sizes, but this is a breed that retains strong ties to their working history and that needs for this to be accommodated for in their care and management.

English springer spaniels generally have lovely kind natures and are very loving and affectionate, and loyal to their families. They also tend to be social and outgoing, and keen to make friends with other dogs and people.

They need a significant amount of exercise each day to keep them happy and fit, and they’re clever dogs too, who need to be able to use their brains as well as their paws when having fun! They love playing and learning new skills, and often have a great time in families with children who will let them join in with their games.

English springer spaniels are usually considered to be a pleasure to train and work with, and they are very willing to learn things and get involved in whatever is going on. Keeping the dog’s attention during training can be a challenge as the breed is so quick-witted, so training should be fun and varied.

English springer spaniels have fairly heavy coats with significant amounts of feathering on their legs, chest and tails, and dogs of the breed often seem to have a particular talent for getting wet and mucky, or ploughing through bushes and undergrowth, picking up a coat full of seeds and burs along the way!

This means that they need daily brushing and combing to avoid knots and matting, which the breed can be prone to. Many Springer owners clip their dog’s coat to help to make it easier to care for, but this may be impractical for working dogs, as their thick coats help to protect them from cuts and scratches.

English springer spaniels have an average lifespan of around 10-15 years, and they are generally robust and hardy, but they can be so gung-ho about things that the odd scratch or knock are a simple fact of life for many owners.

There are quite a few health issues that can be found in some Springer breed lines, and you can find out more about these here. In particular, English springer spaniel breeders are advised to have their parent stock tested for several hereditary health conditions prior to breeding, and so prospective buyers of dogs of the breed should find out about health test results for any litter before committing to a purchase.

Number 2: The Labrador Retriever

The Labrador retriever is another large, retrieving gun dog breed that is instantly recognisable to most of us in the UK, and that like the golden retriever, is a breed that has performed a huge and varied number of different working roles since they first began helping humans.

Labrador retrievers are excellent at finding and carrying game birds back to handlers without damaging them, but they also make excellent assistance dogs, therapy dogs, and sniffer dogs in other applications too. Labs are one of the most popular dog breeds in the UK overall, and have been for many decades.

  • The Labrador retriever is the 2nd most popular gun dog breed in the UK, based on the number of adverts placed here in 2018 for Labrador retriever dogs and litters for sale throughout the year.
  • During 2018, Pets4Homes hosted a total of 8,318 adverts for Labrador retriever dogs and litters for sale.
  • The average price on adverts for Labrador retrievers advertised for sale on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £686.
  • Of the total number of Labrador retrievers advertised here in 2018, 4,030 of the dogs and litters were Kennel Club registered pedigrees, offered for sale with an average asking price of £780 each.
  • The remaining 4,288 Labrador adverts in 2018 were for unregistered or non-pedigree Labs, with an average asking price of £597 each.

Again, the number of non-pedigree dogs of the breed advertised in 2018 slightly exceeds the number of pedigrees, but once more, the split is not far off 50-50.

Whilst Labradors are still one of the most chosen dog breeds used as gun dogs for working with shooters, they are most widely owned in the UK as pets and companions. Many people looking for a good pet aren’t overly concerned about their dog’s pedigree status and again, there is a preference amongst many working Labrador owners for working-type lines rather than show quality dogs, which are bred for temperament and abilities rather than for a specific appearance.

So, what makes the Labrador retriever so popular, and why are there so many of them here in the UK? First of all, the breed is very well established here, and most dog lovers recognise Labradors on sight, which means that they are one of the first dog breeds that come to mind for many people seeking a large dog for their next pet.

The average purchase cost of Labradors is relatively competitive for a breed of this size too, and places them well within the budget of most prospective puppy buyers.

Labradors aren’t low maintenance dogs, but they do have amazing personalities; they are very loving and loyal, kind natured, and outgoing and social with both other people and dogs. They are also really good at adjusting their behaviour to avoid scaring smaller dogs or people who may be nervous, thanks to their intuitive, kind and smart tempers.

The Labrador coat is short and not overly onerous to care for, although these dogs to tend to shed heavily compared to many other breeds. They’re not as prone to picking up burs and knots as many other breeds, although Labradors do have a tendency to get into a mess even on urban walks, and they often love puddles, mud and swimming!

Labradors are very high energy dogs, and need a lot of long, varied and interesting walks every day to keep them happy and fulfilled, and to keep them at a healthy weight. This usually fits in well with the lifestyle of active families, but can be hard to provide for in households where most of the family is out for the larger part of the day or not keen on walking!

Most Labradors are robust, healthy dogs, and the breed has an average lifespan of around 10-12 years. This is towards the low-to-average range for a large dog breed, and reflects the fact that despite the large population of Labradors in the UK, there are quite a number of hereditary Labrador health issues that can affect individual dogs and breed lines.

Number 1: The Cocker Spaniel

Taking the top spot in our list of the most popular gun dog breeds in the UK is another retrieving breed, and the third spaniel within the top ten – the cocker spaniel. We mentioned the American cocker spaniel as the 10th most popular gun dog breed in the UK, and right at the top of the list in the number one spot comes their close cousins, the English cocker spaniel.

  • The cocker spaniel is the most popular gun dog breed in the UK bar none, based on the number of adverts placed on Pets4Homes for cocker dogs and litters in 2018.
  • Over the course of 2018, a total of 8,935 cocker spaniel dogs and litters were advertised here on Pets4Homes.
  • The average advertised price for cocker spaniels for sale on Pets4Homes in 2018 was £672 per dog.
  • Of the total number of cocker spaniel adverts placed here in 2018, 3,620 of them were Kennel Club registered pedigrees. These were advertised at an average price of £788 per dog.
  • The remaining 5,315 cocker spaniel adverts placed in 2018 were for non-pedigree or unregistered dogs of the breed, which were advertised for an average of £594 each.

Non-pedigree cocker spaniels outnumbered the amount of pedigrees for sale by quite a margin in 2018, and again, the breed’s widespread popularity and the large population of these dogs in the UK means that there is a lot of demand for them as pets, and cockers are still seen in working retrieving roles in many areas of the UK too.

Demand for working and pet cocker spaniels is rather higher than for show quality or breed standard dogs, reflecting once more a distinct variation between working lines and show lines in the minds of breeders and puppy buyers.

So, what makes the cocker spaniel such an enduringly popular gun dog breed? This is the breed that has perhaps made the transition from working roles to life as pets with the greatest ease, and this along with the medium size of the breed ensures that they are adaptable and versatile enough to perform either working roles or live as pets – or in some cases, both.

Like all retrieving gun dog types, cocker spaniels are intelligent dogs with high energy levels, but as long as they get sufficient walks, they are not the fizziest breeds to share a home with, and aren’t quite as challenging in the exercise stakes as most other gun dog breeds. They are happy left alone for a few hours at a time as long as they have something to entertain themselves with, and are very good with children, usually thriving within family homes.

They do, however, need a lot of grooming and like the English springer spaniel, tend to get mucky very quickly and pick up a lot of burs and muck when out on walks.

One downside of the breed is that their overall health isn’t as good as many others, and there are a long list of hereditary health problems that can be found in individual dogs and breed lines. Show-quality breed lines in particular are associated more commonly with a frightening neurological condition called cocker rage syndrome, which is less prevalent in working lines – which helps to explain to some extent the high level of demand for working lines and non-pedigree dogs of the breed.

The relatively competitive average prices of cocker spaniels for sale in the UK, along with their medium size and general versatility all helps to ensure that the cocker spaniel is the most popular gun dog breed in the UK, and a firm favourite amongst dog lovers in general too.


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