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Ten Things You Need To Know About The Dachshund Before You Buy One

The Dachshund is also known as the “sausage dog,” and this is a very easy to recognise dog breed thanks to their short legs and long bodies. The Dachshund is a popular breed within the UK as a whole, being the 14th most popular overall, and there is a lot to recommend these comical little dogs to many different types of owners.

However, the Dachshund should not be considered to necessarily be a very easy dog breed to own and manage just because they’re relatively small, and anyone considering buying a dog of the breed needs to ensure that they thoroughly understand the Dachshund and their pros and cons before going ahead with a purchase.

If you’re starting to research the Dachshund dog breed with a view to buying one yourself, this article will share ten important things you need to know, before you make a final decision and pick a puppy. Read on to learn more.

The Dachshund has a form of canine dwarfism

The Dachshund’s unique conformation and appearance occurs due to a form of achondroplasia or dwarfism, which results in dogs of the breed having a normal-sized body and abnormally shortened legs.

This helped dogs of the breed to carry out their historical working role of hunting and pest control, as they could purse animals that live underground (like badgers) into their setts, where a taller dog would not be able to fit.

…Which can cause spinal problems in some dogs of the breed

The length of the Dachshund’s back in relation to their legs is a rather unbalanced ratio, and the longer the dog’s body compared to the shortness of their legs, the higher the likelihood of the dog suffering from spinal problems as the body is not supported fully and equally along its length.

Intervertebral disc disease is a particular problem within the breed, and dogs with a very long body may ultimately develop Dachshund paralysis, which can often be avoided by choosing a dog with a more moderate leg to body ratio.

Dachshunds can also be found in miniature sizes

We tend to think of the Dachshund as being a small breed, but they are short rather than small, and dogs that fall within the larger range of the normal size spectrum are often larger and longer than many people expect.

As well as the Dachshund itself, there is also the miniature Dachshund, which is classed as a separate breed in its own right. If you’ve decided a Dachshund is the right breed for you but you’d like a smaller dog, this is an alternative breed to consider.

The Dachshund is not necessarily a good choice for family homes

Whether or not any given dog gets on well with children very much depends on the individual temperaments of both the dog and the kids and vitally, on how the dog is trained and managed and gotten used to kids, and how the children behave around the dog too.

Many Dachshunds do live happily in family homes and get on very well with the children in the family, but this is not one of the dog breeds that is most commonly associated with an affinity for children.

Dachshunds don’t tend to like a lot of noise and fuss and they do like to be the centre of attention, which often conflicts with a peaceable family life.


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Dogs of the breed can be a challenge to train

Dachshunds aren’t stupid dogs, but neither are they highly ranked in the intelligence stakes, and the breed also has a real stubborn streak that can be hard to grapple with too.

This means that Dachshunds can be a bit challenging and inconsistent in terms of their ability to learn and follow commands, which means in turn that they require a lot of patience and commitment from their owners to teach them commands.

…And they often take a while to become properly house trained

The Dachshund breed is also one that often takes longer than normal to house train so that the dog asks to go outside rather than toileting in the house.

This can be frustrating and annoying for their owners, and once more, requires patience, consistency, and a positive approach to training.

Dachshunds of certain colours have a heightened risk of health problems

Dachshunds come in a variety of different colours and coat styles, but not every colour that can be found within the Dachshund breed is considered to be acceptable or positive.

Some Dachshund coat colours come with a heightened risk of health problems as well, and as such, dogs that display these colours cannot be registered with the Kennel Club. Colours to avoid are double dapple, piebald and blue, as well as a shade sometimes called “Isabella,” which is also not recognised within the breed.

Dachshunds are quite expensive to buy

Dachshunds are surprisingly expensive to buy based on the average advertised prices for Dachshund puppies for sale on the Pets4Homes website, being around the £1,248 mark for pedigree dogs and £812 even for non-pedigrees.

This means that many people who might wish to own a Dachshund – and particularly, a pedigree one – may be unable to fund their purchase, so this is something to consider before you continue with your research.

They’re not a hugely high energy dog breed

Dachshunds need walks and exercise like any other dog, and they won’t thrive if their need for exercise is neglected. However, they are not one of the most high energy of breeds and will usually be perfectly happy with just a couple of half-hour walks each day, which should be fun, varied and engaging.

They can be a good choice for first time owners, with some caveats

Dachshunds are in many respects a good pick for first time owners, being not overly challenging to walk and small in size. However, dogs of the breed can be stubborn and prone to ignoring you if you’re not entertaining them, and they do tend to take longer than normal to train.

Dachshunds can become dominant and snappy with incorrect handling or poor management, and plenty of research is required before you can make an informed decision on whether or not to buy a Dachshund.


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