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Ten Things You Need To Know About The Old Tyme Bulldog Before You Buy One

The old tyme bulldog is one of several different types of bulldogs that can be found in the UK, and one that is perhaps less well known than many of the others, but also, one that is increasing in popularity as time goes by too.

Old tyme bulldogs are one of the dog types that today, is generally considered to be in development as a healthier alternative to the more common English bulldog, a breed that is plagued with high-profile health issues across much of the breed population.

However, the old tyme bulldog is still a relatively young dog type, although its origins go back much further, and so there is not a high degree of uniformity in terms of the shared traits of individual dogs of the type, and people’s expectations of them.

If the handsome and distinctive old tyme bulldog has caught your eye and you want to find out more, or if you are concerned about the health of other bulldog breeds and are looking for alternatives, this article will help you out.

Read on to learn ten things you need to know about the old tyme bulldog before you buy one.

The old tyme bulldog is not a pedigree dog breed

First of all, the old tyme bulldog is not recognised by the Kennel Club, and they’re not classed as a pedigree dog breed. This means that they cannot be registered with the Kennel Club, nor entered into breed shows.

Old tyme bulldogs are correctly referred to as a dog type rather than a dog breed as a result of this, although this is not to say that they might not become eligible for Kennel Club registration at some point in the future.

There is no consensus on their core traits or appearance

Because the old tyme bulldog is not recognised by the Kennel Club, there is no formal consensus on the appearance of dogs of this type, nor what core temperament and personality traits they should have. 

Additionally, the parentage and component breeds that make up the ancestry of any given old tyme bulldog can be quite variable and so, result in a reasonable amount of variation from dog to dog too.

…But they tend to have a taller, leaner appearance than most bulldog types

Whilst the term “old tyme bulldog” is one with a fairly loose meaning due to the factors outlined above, there are some broadly accepted traits that dogs of this type tend to possess. Firstly they are usually taller, leaner and less heavyset and square than the average English bulldog, and vitally, their muzzles tend to be longer and more moderate too.

They were developed from English bulldogs and outcrossing to other breeds

The English bulldog is one of the foundation breeds used in the development of the old tyme bulldog type, and generally, this involves the breeding of English bulldogs that are not overly exaggerated in terms of their physical traits.

Other breeds used in the development of old tyme bulldogs can vary, but commonly include dogs of the mastiff type, and other bull-type breeds like Staffordshire bull terriers, although this can be hugely variable.


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The intention of breeding old tyme bulldogs is to produce a moderate, healthy dog

In most people’s opinion, the goal of breeding old tyme bulldogs is to produce a bulldog type that more reflects the English bulldog’s historical, more moderate and so, healthier appearance than that displayed by the vast majority of dogs of the breed today.

This means a taller, leaner build, a longer muzzle than the English bulldog, better dentition and less dental crowding, and selective breeding for health – and to reduce the incidence rate of hereditary health issues like allergies and skin problems that are common to the English bulldog breed.

The health of old tyme bulldogs is not guaranteed

Whilst old tyme bulldogs are bred to be moderate and healthy, the health of any individual dog and the success of its breeder at achieving these aims cannot be guaranteed.

Breeding and outcrossing from breeds with complex health challenges like the English bulldog means that such health issues may be replicated in their offspring, although responsible breeding programmes work to reduce the risk of health issues in each subsequent generation produced.

Many old tyme bulldog breeders undertake pre-breeding health screening on their parent stock to ensure that they stand the best possible chances of producing healthy pups, so ask any breeder you might be considering buying from about health test results before you commit to a purchase.

Dogs of this type can be stubborn and dominant

Bulldogs of all types often have a stubborn streak a mile wide, and the old tyme bulldog is no exception. They require clear, confident but empathic handling, and appropriate rules and boundaries that are enforced consistently to avoid dominance issues.

…But they are also very loyal and loving

Old tyme bulldogs are also very loyal and affectionate dogs that are gentle and calm with their families and the people that the trust. They often have a particular affinity with family children, but care should be taken when introducing newcomers, and younger children should always be supervised around dogs.

The breed is fairly active for a bulldog breed

The old tyme bulldog tends to be more active than most other bulldog breeds, due to their leaner, fitter builds and longer muzzles. However, they aren’t generally hugely onerous to exercise appropriately, usually being happy with around an hour of lively, varied exercise each day.

They might be a good pick for first time dog owners

In many cases, the old tyme bulldog will be an appropriate choice of pet for even a first-time dog owner, because they are very middle of the road in many respects – like their energy levels, size, intelligence, and preferences.

However, plenty of research is needed before making a final decision, and you should also ensure that you factor in the level of variance that can be found within this dog type from one dog to another.


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