American Bully


Looking for a American Bully ?

Contents

Key Breed Facts
Breed Characteristics
Breed Highlights
Introduction
History
Appearance
Temperament
Intelligence / Trainability
Children and Other Pets
Health
Caring for a American Bully
Grooming
Exercise
Feeding
Average Cost to keep/care for a American Bully
Breed Specific Buying Advice


Key Breed Facts


Popularity #239 out of 244 Dog Breeds.


The American Bully breed is also commonly known by the names American Bullies.
Lifespan
8 - 12 years
Pedigree Breed ?
No - Not Currently KC Recognised
Height
Males 33 – 53 cm
Females 33 – 53 cm at the withers
Weight
Males 31 – 120+ kg
Females 31 – 120+ kg
Average Price (More Info)
£0 for Non KC Registered (Not Enough Data)

Breed Characteristics



Breed Highlights

Positives

  • Intelligent, loyal and devoted canine companion
  • American Bullies are outgoing, fun-loving, confident dogs
  • They are gentle, good-natured and very loving always eager to please
  • Thrives on lots of exercise and mental stimulation
  • Low maintenance on the grooming front
  • They are good watchdogs with some being more alert than others

Negatives

  • Not the best choice for first time dog owners
  • Not the best choice for families with smaller children
  • American Bullies must be taught their place in the pack and who is alpha dog
  • Early socialisation combined with the right training is a must
  • American Bullies are highly protective of their families
  • Puppies are exuberant and boisterous
  • Can be aggressive towards other dogs
  • Known to be stubborn and strong-willed when the mood takes them
  • American Bullies have a high prey drive and should not be trusted around smaller pets

Introduction

American Bullies were developed to be a companion and although American Pit Bull Terriers were originally used in breeding programmes, todays American Bullies are recognised as a completely different and separate breed. They have a very similar “look” and “build” but it is now recognised that American Bullies are quite unique in that their temperaments are much calmer and relaxed than their Pitbull counterparts thanks to the use of American Bulldogs, English Bulldogs and Olde English Bulldogges being used in their breeding.

American Bullies are not recognised by any of the major international dog associations which includes the UK Kennel Club. The breed is however, recognised by the United Kennel Club and several other dog registries around the world.


History

American Bullies first appeared on the scene in the US during the 1990’s when breeders decided to develop a companion and show dog crossing American Pitbull Terriers with American Staffordshire Terriers. The reason for developing American Bullies was to create a breed that did not have the high “drive and dog aggression” of the Pitbull, but which retained their looks and build. No one really knows whether the breeder’s intentions were to create a “new breed” or whether their goal was to develop a dog with a different temperament to that of a Pitbull. The end result, however, was that a new breed was created namely the American Bully. Dozens of breeders all around the United States began developing these dogs whether they were in contact with each other or not.

The main regions of the US where American Bullies were developed was Virginia and Southern California, but news of their efforts soon spread to other areas of the USA.

With this said, other breeds were introduced into the breeding programme which includes American Bulldogs, English Bulldogs, Olde English Bulldogges, Bullmastiffs, Bull Terriers, Rottweilers and even other cross breeds. It is worth noting that because so many US breeders were involved in developing the breed, American Bullies can be quite different in looks and size with some dogs being a lot smaller than others when compared to American Pitbulls. Coat colours and patterns vary a great deal too. When it comes to body structure, American Bullies can be quite different in shape but in general they are thick set, stocky and extremely muscular.

How the breed’s name came about and when American Bullies were first recognised as being a “new breed” remains unclear, but enthusiasts were around by the turn of the 21st Century. From this time onwards, American Bullies have found a large fanbase in the United States and elsewhere in the world, including the UK. It is worth noting that the majority of well-bred American Bullies have excellent “pedigrees” which proves they are not American Pitbull Terriers and are therefore not classed as a “banned dangerous breed” in the UK.

Interesting facts about the breed

  • Is the American Bully a vulnerable breed? No, they are fast becoming a popular breed in the UK as well as in other countries of the world including their native America
  • American Bullies were specifically bred to be companions and show dogs
  • They excel at many canine sports
  • There are 4 types of American Bullies – pocket, standard, extra-large, extreme and classic
  • American Bullies have an athletic build being muscular and well-defined showing a lot of power and agility
  • The breed is recognised by the UKC, ABKC, ACA, BBC, DRA, EBKC and the UCA
  • American Bullies were first recognised by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 2013

Appearance

Height at the withers: Males  33 – 53 cm, Females  33 – 53 cm

Average weight: Males 31 – 120+kg, Females 31 – 120+kg

American Bullies are impressive dogs with extremely muscular bodies. They have unique shaped heads which is one of the breed’s key characteristics. Heads are broad and very large without ever being out of proportion with the rest of the body. They have moderately deep, well-defined stops and flew are deep and clean. American Bullies have well-muscled cheeks which are wrinkle free and quite prominent.

Muzzles are broad being slightly square or “blocky” with the length being shorter than the length of a dog’s skull and tops of muzzles are straight. Lower jaws are very well developed, deep and wide with the overall structure of a dog’s jaw, their muzzles, and skull planes look very much like those of the English Bulldog.

American Bullies have large noses with well-opened nostrils and all nose pigmentations are acceptable but are typically in keeping with a dog’s coat colour. They have perfect scissor even bites. Eyes are moderate in size, oval or slightly rounded being set well apart and quite low on a dog’s skull. All eye colours are acceptable with the exception of blue. Their ears are set high on a dog’s head.

They have moderately long and well-muscled necks which are slightly arched at the crest. Their necks get gradually wider at a dog’s well laid-backed shoulders. They have close-coupled bodies with deep, broad chests and nicely sprung ribs. Chests can be wider than they are deep, but never exaggerated. American Bullies have wide, strong and firm backs and their toplines are level and straight. Croups slopes a little downwards towards the base of a dog’s tail. Loins are short and wide.

American Bullies have long, muscular and wide shoulder blades that are well laid back. Their front legs are muscular, strong having a slight turn in the forearm. Elbows are set close together or just a little away from a dog’s body. When seen from the front, a dog’s front legs are set moderately apart being perpendicular to the ground. Pasterns are powerful, short, flexible and set a little at an angle.

Their hindquarters are muscular, broad and powerful with dogs having well filled-in and deep rumps. Thighs are well-developed and muscular and when seen from the side, hock joints are nicely bent with pasterns being well let down, perpendicular to the ground. When seen from behind, rear pasterns are parallel to each other.

Feet are round, tight and well in proportion to a dog’s overall size. Tails are often described as being “pump handle” or “crank” tails although some American Bullies have straight tails which is acceptable under the UKC standard. Their tails are set as a natural extension to a dog’s topline and tapers to the tip. American Bullies carry their tails level with their toplines although when excited, they may carry them slightly higher.

When it comes to an American Bully’s coat, this is smooth, close lying and glossy being slightly stiff to the touch. They come in all colours with the exception of merle.

Gait/movement

When an American Bully moves, they do so with a confident, jaunty way always giving the impression of being excited and alert.

Faults

When it comes to faults in the breed as recognised by the United Kennel Club these are as follows:

  • Excessively tall or short
  • Overly large
  • Dwarfism
  • Exaggeration in a dog’s structure
  • Excessively large, heavy, head which is disproportionate to the body
  • Muzzle too short and blunt which interferes with normal breathing
  • Snipey muzzles
  • Weak lower jaw
  • Excessive flews
  • Muzzle slightly turned up at nostrils
  • Undershot bite
  • Wry bite
  • Exaggerated bowed front legs
  • Exaggerated wide chests
  • Splayed feet
  • Bobbed tail
  • Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid
  • Viciousness or extreme shyness
  • Bat ears
  • Albinism
  • Merle colour coat
  • Long coat
  • Screw tail
  • Unilateral or bilateral deafness

Temperament

American Bullies are happy characters and because they were developed to be companions, they form extremely strong ties with their owners. They may look tough, but in reality, American Bullies are real softies and boast having “fawning” natures and they love nothing more than to spend as much time as possible with the people they love. As such, they make wonderful family pets and are not “one man dogs” whatsoever.

American Bullies are also known to be exceptionally good around children, with this said, as with any other breed, children must never be left unsupervised around then and they should be taught how to behave around dogs and dogs must be well socialised from a young enough age too in order for them to mature into good natured canine companions.

As a rule of thumb, American Bullies are tolerant around people they don’t already know and are known to be friendly and polite when they meet strangers. Some American Bullies are more suspicious of strangers than others, but in general they are all too happy to greet people with excitement. They are, however, naturally protective of their families but it is worth noting that this trait is always done calmly, much like an English Bulldog which means they are good watchdogs.

Being intelligent and eager to please, many American Bullies have been trained to compete in different canine sporting activities making them versatile by nature. However, they are not a good choice for first time dog owners because American Bullies need to know their place in the pack and who is “alpha dog” in a household for them to be truly well-balanced, happy characters. If they are not well handled from a young age, an American Bully may take on the role of dominant dog. With this said, in the right hands and environment, American Bullies are not generally known to “challenge” authority, but they will not follow commands blindly either.

Although eager to please, some American Bullies are known to have a bit of a stubborn streak which is why many breed enthusiasts recommend training them on a reward basis which works very well. The reason being that American Bullies will do almost anything for a treat.

American Bullies are relaxed and calm by nature but this does not mean they are “couch potatoes”. They enjoy being out and about doing things, more especially playing interactive games although fetching a ball may get a little too boring for an American Bully after the first few throws.

Are they a good choice for first time owners?

American Bullies are not a good choice for first time dog owners because they may get the better of them. This could result in a dog taking on the role of dominant dog making them much harder to handle and live with.

What about prey drive?

American Bully breeders have done a lot of work to reduce a dog’s prey drive, but it is still extremely important for these dogs to be well socialised, correctly handled and trained by people who are familiar with the breed’s needs. With this said, even a well-trained American Bully should not be fully trusted around small animals they have not grown up with.

What about playfulness?

American Bullies are known to be very playful and fun-loving by nature and they enjoy messing around with the kids whenever they can.

What about adaptability?

American Bullies are very adaptable by nature and providing they are given enough daily exercise combined with lots of mental stimulation, they are just as happy living in an apartment in town as they would be living in a house in the country.

What about excessive barking?

American Bullies are not known to be “barkers” and will generally only voice an opinion when necessary or during playtime.

Do American Bullies like water?

Like many other breeds, some American Bullies love being in and around water, whereas others do not like getting their feet wet.

Are American Bullies good watchdogs?

American Bullies are very people-oriented, but they do make good watchdogs with some dogs being more suspicious of strangers and more alert than some other American Bullies. With this said, their impressive “looks” are often enough to put wrongdoers off approaching an American Bully when they are on their own territory.


Intelligence / Trainability

American Bullies are highly intelligent and always eager to please although some dogs can have a bit of a stubborn streak. With this said, in the right hands and environment, American Bullies are very trainable and they respond well to positive reinforcement and treat-based training methods. Training and socialisation must start early and it must be consistent throughout a dog’s life because an American Bully may take on the dominant role in a household if they are not correctly handled and taught their place in the pack which is why they are not a good choice for novice dog owners.

Puppies need to be taught the basic commands straight away which includes the following:

  • Come
  • Sit
  • Stay
  • Quiet
  • Leave it
  • Down
  • Bed

Children and Other Pets

American Bullies adore being around children and love nothing more than to play interactive games with them. However, they can be protective of their families which means that when the children have friends over, it’s best to keep an eye on things and never leave any dog unsupervised around children.

Although breeders have done their best to breed “aggressiveness” out of American Bullies, the breed is still known to be “dog aggressive”.  However, they are a lot more tolerant of other dogs than some other breeds. With this said, unneutered American Bullies are more dog aggressive and territorial than their neutered counterparts and same-sex aggression and dominance can be an issue.

For further advice please read our article on Keeping Children Safe around Dogs.


American Bully Health

The average life expectancy of an American Bully is between 8 and 12 years when properly cared for and fed an appropriate good quality diet to suit their ages. However, they are known to suffer from certain hereditary and acquired health issues which are detailed below:

  • Hip dysplasia– dogs should be tested through the Animal Health Trust (AHT)
  • Elbow dysplasia – dogs should be tested through the Animal Health Trust (AHT)
  • Progressive retinal atrophy – dogs should be tested through the Animal Health Trust (AHT)
  • Demodicosis/demodex mange/demodectic mange
  • Cataracts
  • Cerebellar abiotrophy
  • Atrophy
  • Cleft lip/palette
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Ichthyosis
  • Luxating patella
  • Zinc responsive dermatosis
  • Congenital heart failure
  • Brachycephalic syndrome
  • Gassiness
  • Heat intolerance

What about vaccinations?

American Bully puppies would have had their first vaccinations, but it's essential for them to have their follow-up jabs at the right time with the vaccination schedule being as follows:

  • 10 -12 weeks old, bearing in mind that a puppy would not have full protection straight away, but would be fully protected 2 weeks after they have had their second vaccination

There has been a lot of discussion about the need for dogs to have boosters. As such, it's best to talk to a vet before making a final decision on whether an American Bully should continue to have annual vaccinations which are known as boosters.

What about spaying and neutering?

A male American Bully can safely be neutered when they are 6 months old and females can be spayed when they are 6 months old too.

What about obesity problems?

American Bullies like their food and are prone to gaining weight if not given enough daily exercise. Obesity can shorten a dog’s life by several years so it is essential to keep an eye on an American Bully’s weight and to keep treats to a minimum.

What about allergies?

The American Bully is known to suffer from certain allergies and if there is a flare up, it is important to seek veterinary advice sooner rather than later because identifying triggers can prove challenging and time consuming.

Allergy triggers include the following:

  • Environment
  • A reaction to certain chemicals commonly found in household cleaning products
  • Seasonal allergies which includes pollen and grasses
  • Food which includes certain meats and cereals often used as ingredients in commercially produced dog food
  • Tick and flea bites
  • Dust mites
  • Mould

What about breed specific breeding restrictions?

Currently, the American Bully is not recognised by the Kennel Club and as such there are not breed specific breeding restrictions in place for the breed. However, responsible breeders should always follow Kennel Club breeding guidelines to ensure that American Bullies remain healthy.

What about Assured Breeder requirements?

There are no Assured Breeders for the American Bully because the breed is not recognised by the Kennel Club.


Caring for a American Bully

As with any other breed, American Bullies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs at the different stages of their lives.

Caring for a American Bully puppy

Having decided that an American Bully is the right choice of dog, it's important to get things ready in the home for a puppy's arrival. With this said, it's not just a house that needs puppy-proofing, but the garden too needs to be made safe for them to roam around in. All puppies like to gnaw on things and this includes electric wires and cables so it's essential that they be put out of their reach. Garden tools and other implements should be stored away to avoid a boisterous puppy from injuring themselves.

Puppies need a lot of nap time and they can sleep for anything up to 21 hours a day which they need to do so they can develop and grow properly. As such, it's important to set up a quiet area in a house for them to retreat to when they want to take a nap and ideally this should be not to out of the way but away from too much traffic. If there are children in the house, they need to be told not to disturb their pet when they are sleeping and not to approach them when they are eating too.

It's always a good idea to limit the amount of rooms a puppy can roam around in for several reasons, one of which is because they would need to be housetrained and the second being they are less likely to get into trouble. A good way of keeping them in a chosen area is to fit child gates on doors to prevent the puppy from going into any rooms that owners don't want them to go in.

An American Bully puppy would have been wormed before being sold and the documentation a breeder provides for a puppy must have all the details of their worming date and the product used as well as the information relating to their microchip. It is essential for puppies to be wormed again keeping to a schedule which is as follows:

  • Puppies should be wormed at 6 months old
  • They need to be wormed again when they are 8 months old
  • Puppies should be wormed when they are 10 months old
  • They need to be wormed when they are 12 months old

Things you'll need for your puppy

There are items needed to care for a puppy which should be purchased well in advance of their arrival. The items needed include the following:

  • Feed and water bowls making sure they are not too deep and ideally, they should be ceramic rather than plastic or metal
  • A good quality dog collar, harness and lead
  • A dog crate that's not too small or too big that a puppy would feel lost in it
  • Good quality toys and chews
  • A well-made dog bed bearing in mind that a puppy could well chew on it
  • Baby and/or dog blankets to use in the puppy's crate and dog bed
  • Dog specific toothpaste and tooth brush
  • Shampoo and conditioner specifically formulated for use on dogs
  • Grooming equipment

Keeping the noise down

All puppies are very sensitive to loud noises so it is important to keep the volume of a television down and not to play music too loudly either because it could frighten a American Bully puppy and prevent them from napping as they should during the day.

Keeping vet appointments

Reputable breeders would always ensure their puppies vaccinated before they are sold, but as previously mentioned, it is up to their new owners to make sure they are given their follow-up shots at the right time which should be as follows:

  • 10 -12 weeks old, bearing in mind that a puppy would not have full protection straight away, but would only be fully protected 2 weeks after they have had their second vaccination

When it comes to boosters, it's best to discuss these with a vet because there is a lot of debate about whether a dog really needs them after a certain time. However, if a dog ever needed to go into kennels, their vaccinations would need to be up to date.

What about American Bullies when they reach their golden years?

When American Bullies reach their golden years, they get slower in many ways. They might start showing their age with more grey hairs appearing on their faces and more especially around their muzzles. Apart from a change in their appearance an American Bully’s personality might change too and this includes on how quick they are to respond to a command or when their names are called. The reason for this is that many older dog's hearing is not as good as it once was. Other changes to watch out for in a American Bully when they reach their senior years include the following:

  • Their vision might be impaired and their eyes seem cloudy
  • Their teeth might not be as in good condition which means they may need dental work
  • Older dogs tend to sleep more during the day and they get up more frequently at night which is often because their cognitive function is not as sharp as it was when they were young which means older dogs are more easily confused
  • They tend to be less tolerant of loud noises and sounds
  • Dogs when they are older can be a little fussier about their food so it's important to rethink their diet and to make sure they are getting all the nutrients they need to stay healthy
  • An older dog's immune system often does not offer them the same protection against illness and infection which puts them more at risk of catching something and why they should see the vet more routinely
  • An older American Bully might not be so keen to go out for a walk and more especially longer ones
  • They muscle tone and body condition is not as good as when they were young
  • Older dogs often suffer from joint problems which can then lead to arthritis so it's well worth investing in a comfy dog bed and ideally one that an American Bully finds easier to get out of

Grooming

American Bullies have short, tight, close coats which in short means they are low maintenance on the grooming front. However, because they are prone to suffer from skin allergies, it's best to give them the once over a few times a week. The earlier a skin problem is detected the better because if left for too long, it could flare up into something painful and a lot more severe. A regular wipe over with a chamois leather will also keep an American Bully's coat nice and glossy.

It's also important to check a dog's ears on a regular basis and to clean them when necessary. If too much wax builds up in a dog's ears, it can lead to a painful infection which can be hard to clear up. In short, prevention is often easier than cure when it comes to ear infections.

Grooming tools needed for an American Bully

Having the right grooming tools helps keep an American Bully's coat and skin in top condition. The tools needed to keep a dog's coat looking good are as follows:

  • A grooming glove
  • A slicker brush
  • A bristle brush
  • Nail clippers
  • A pair of round ended scissors
  • Dog specific shampoo and conditioner

Exercise

Although not as active as many other “bully-type” breeds, the American Bully does need to be given a minimum of 45 to 60 minutes exercise every day. A shorter walk in the morning is fine, but a longer one in the afternoon is a must. This combined with lots of mental stimulation will keep an American Bully happy, fit and healthy. If left to their own devices for long periods of time, not only will boredom set in but it could lead to an American Bully developing some unwanted and destructive behaviours around the home. It could also lead to dogs putting on too much weight which can shorten their lives by several years.

With this said, American Bully puppies should not be over exercised because their joints and bones are still growing and too much pressure on them could result in causing a dog a few problems later on in their lives. They should not be allowed to jump up or off furniture nor should they be allowed to run up and down the stairs for this very reason.


Feeding

If you get an American Bully puppy from a breeder, they would give you a feeding schedule and it's important to stick to the same routine, feeding the same food to a puppy to avoid any tummy upsets. A puppy's diet can be changed, but this needs to be done gradually, always making sure they don't develop any digestive upsets and if they do, it's best to put them back on their original diet and to discuss things with the vet before attempting to change it again.

Older dogs are not known to be fussy or finicky eaters, but this does not mean you can feed them a lower quality diet. It's best to feed a mature dog twice a day, once in the morning and then again in the evening, making sure it's good quality food that meets all their nutritional requirements. It's also important that dogs be given the right amount of exercise so they burn off any excess calories or they might gain too much weight which can lead to all sorts of health issues. Obesity can shorten a dog's life by several years so it's important to keep an eye on their waistline from the word go.

Feeding guide for a American Bully puppy

Once a puppy is settled into their new homes, it is safe to change their diets, but as previously touched upon, it needs to be done gradually and carefully to avoid any tummy upsets. As a rough guide, American Bully puppies can be fed the following amounts every day to ensure they are getting all the nutrients they need to grow and develop properly:

  • 2 months old - 231g to 271g depending on a puppy's build
  • 3 months old - 276g to 341g depending on a puppy's build
  • 4 months old - 297g to 371g depending on a puppy's build
  • 5 months old - 304g to 410g depending on a puppy's build
  • 6 months old - 304g to 446g depending on a puppy's build
  • 7 months old - 282g to 446g depending on a puppy's build
  • 9 months old - 240g to 387g depending on a puppy's build
  • 11 months old - 216g to 320g depending on a puppy's build
  • 12 months old - 215g to 318g depending on a puppy's build
  • 11 months old - 476 g to 991 g depending on a puppy's build
  • 12 months old - 434 g to 1201 g depending on a puppy's build

When an American Bully is 13 months old, they can be fed adult dog food.

Feeding guide for an adult American Bully

As a rough guide, an adult fully grown American Bully can be fed the following amounts every day to ensure they stay fit and healthy:

  • Dogs weighing 31 kg can be fed 320g to 512g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 50 kg can be fed 380g to 420g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 70 kg can be fed 420g to 492g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 90 kg can be fed 480g to 552g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 120 kg can be fed 552g to 600g depending on activity

Average Cost to keep/care for a American Bully

If you get an American Bully puppy from a breeder, they would give you a feeding schedule and it's important to stick to the same routine, feeding the same food to a puppy to avoid any tummy upsets. A puppy's diet can be changed, but this needs to be done gradually, always making sure they don't develop any digestive upsets and if they do, it's best to put them back on their original diet and to discuss things with the vet before attempting to change it again.

Older dogs are not known to be fussy or finicky eaters, but this does not mean you can feed them a lower quality diet. It's best to feed a mature dog twice a day, once in the morning and then again in the evening, making sure it's good quality food that meets all their nutritional requirements. It's also important that dogs be given the right amount of exercise so they burn off any excess calories or they might gain too much weight which can lead to all sorts of health issues. Obesity can shorten a dog's life by several years so it's important to keep an eye on their waistline from the word go.

Feeding guide for a American Bully puppy

Once a puppy is settled into their new homes, it is safe to change their diets, but as previously touched upon, it needs to be done gradually and carefully to avoid any tummy upsets. As a rough guide, American Bully puppies can be fed the following amounts every day to ensure they are getting all the nutrients they need to grow and develop properly:

  • 2 months old - 231g to 271g depending on a puppy's build
  • 3 months old - 276g to 341g depending on a puppy's build
  • 4 months old - 297g to 371g depending on a puppy's build
  • 5 months old - 304g to 410g depending on a puppy's build
  • 6 months old - 304g to 446g depending on a puppy's build
  • 7 months old - 282g to 446g depending on a puppy's build
  • 9 months old - 240g to 387g depending on a puppy's build
  • 11 months old - 216g to 320g depending on a puppy's build
  • 12 months old - 215g to 318g depending on a puppy's build
  • 11 months old - 476 g to 991 g depending on a puppy's build
  • 12 months old - 434 g to 1201 g depending on a puppy's build

When an American Bully is 13 months old, they can be fed adult dog food.

Feeding guide for an adult American Bully

As a rough guide, an adult fully grown American Bully can be fed the following amounts every day to ensure they stay fit and healthy:

  • Dogs weighing 31 kg can be fed 320g to 512g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 50 kg can be fed 380g to 420g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 70 kg can be fed 420g to 492g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 90 kg can be fed 480g to 552g depending on activity
  • Dogs weighing 120 kg can be fed 552g to 600g depending on activity

American Bully Buying Advice

When visiting and buying any puppy or dog, there are many important things to consider and questions to ask of the breeder/seller.  You can read our generic puppy/dog advice here which includes making sure you see the puppy with its mother and to verify that the dog has been wormed and microchipped.

The American Bully has found quite a large fanbase in the UK which means that well-bred puppies command a lot of money. As such, with the American Bullies there is specific advice, questions and protocols to follow when buying a puppy which are as follows:

  • Potential owners may find many online and other adverts showing images of adorable American Bully puppies for sale. However, the sellers ask buyers for money up front before agreeing to deliver a puppy to a new home. Potential buyers should never buy a American Bully puppy unseen and should never pay a deposit to a seller before collecting a puppy from them
  • As previously touched upon, the American Bully is gaining a big fanbase in the UK. As such, there are many amateur breeders/people who breed from an American Bully far too often so they can make a quick profit without caring for the welfare of the puppies, their dam or the breed in general. Although not Kennel Club registered, responsible breeders should follow KC guidelines which state that a dam can only produce 4 litters and she must be between a certain age to do so. Anyone wishing to buy an American Bully puppy should think very carefully about who they purchase their puppy from and should always ask to see the relevant paperwork pertaining to a puppy's lineage, their vaccinations and their microchipping
  • Before the tail docking law came into effect in 2007, American Bully traditionally had their tails docked, but since the Animal Welfare Bill came into effect, it is now illegal to dock their tails and anyone who does dock an American Bully puppy's tail would be subject to a heavy fine if they do not have the correct permissions and documentation, this includes breeders and owners
  • It is extremely important for breeders to provide the correct documentation relating to an American Bully's parentage more especially as the breed is often confused with the American Pit Bull and the American Staffordshire Terrier. Having the necessary correct paperwork is essential in proving that an American Bully is what their documents state they are, and not a breed that falls under the Dangerous Dogs Act of 1991
  • It is also worth noting there have been reports that some US-based breeders use steroids to muscle their dogs up. This can lead to many health issues developing when an American Bully is no longer fed steroids which includes joint and internal organ issues

Click 'Like' if you love American Bullys.


Other Dog Breed Profiles


© Copyright - Pets4Homes.co.uk (2005 - 2018) - Pet Media Ltd
Pets4Homes.co.uk use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. Use of this website and other services constitutes acceptance of the Pets4Homes Terms of Use and Privacy and Cookie Policy.