Pomsky


Contents

Key Breed Facts
Breed Characteristics
Introduction
History
Appearance
Temperament
Intelligence / Trainability
Children and Other Pets
Health
Caring for a Pomsky
Grooming
Exercise
Feeding
Average Cost to keep/care for a Pomsky


Key Breed Facts


Popularity #101 out of 238 Dog Breeds.


The Pomsky breed is also commonly known by the names Pomeranian x Siberian Husky.
Lifespan
13 - 15 years
Pedigree Breed ?
No - Hybrid Dog Breed
Height
Males 25.4 - 38.1 cm
Females 25.4 - 38.1 cm at the withers
Weight
Males 9.0 - 13.60 kg
Females 9.0 - 13.60 kg
Health Tests Available
No Health Tests Currently Recommended
Average Price (More Info)
£1,286 for Non KC Registered

Breed Characteristics



Introduction

The Pomsky is one of the newer "designer dogs" or cross breeds to appear on the scene. The breed came about by crossing a Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian and these charming little dogs were an immediate hit with people all over the world, including here in the UK thanks to their adorable looks and their kind and loving albeit often mischievous natures. As such Pomskies over the last few years, they have found their way into the hearts and homes of many people with the added bonus being they are great around children.


History

The Pomsky has only been around for twenty years or so, having first appeared on the scene in America and Canada with both countries having now established their own breed clubs. However, as yet the Pomsky is not recognised by official international breed clubs which includes The Kennel Club here in the UK.

Siberian Huskies and Pomeranians are the parent breeds of the Pomsky and both boast being Spitz-type dogs. As such they share a common ancestry and this includes being similar in appearance and temperament, traits they have passed on to the Pomsky. Although Pomeranians are now considered more as lapdogs, their ancestors were larger working dogs first seen in the Arctic regions of the world.

Pomskies became popular very soon after they appeared on the scene not only in America and Canada, but elsewhere in the world which is hardly surprising given their charming looks, loyal, affectionate natures and the fact they are that much smaller than the Husky, yet larger than a Pomeranian. Today, they are just as popular here in the UK with more breeders developing healthier dogs thanks to careful and selective breeding.


Appearance

Height at the withers: Males 25.4 - 38.1 cm, Females 25.4 - 38.1 cm

Average weight: Males 9.0 - 13.60 kg, Females 9.0 - 13.60 kg

Like most of the newer cross breeds that have appeared on the scene over recent years, Pomskies come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours with some dogs looking more like a Husky whereas others inherit more of the Pomeranian's looks. As such, how a Pomsky turns out is a bit hit and miss at the present time. Puppies from the same litter can be so different in looks and temperament, but the one constant seems to be the fact they always inherit a good variety of Spitz-type traits which includes having pointy ears, a nice curly tail as well as a long muzzle and thick, luxurious coat.

When it comes to their coat, the Pomsky can be a variety of colours which includes those seen in the Siberian Husky and the Pomeranian. The colours and combinations often seen in the Pomsky includes the following:

  • Brown
  • Cream
  • Grey
  • Tan

However, their colour combinations are countless, but they are always striking, especially as many Pomskies inherit the lighter coloured eyes of the Husky which contrasts so well with the colour of their coats, more especially when they are darker. Another consideration is what generation a Pomsky happens to be and whether they are first, second generation dogs.


Temperament

Much in the same way as a Pomsky's appearance can vary quite a lot depending on their parent's appearance, so too can their temperament. However, they are considered to be highly intelligent and extremely playful dogs by nature, traits they share with both the Husky and the Pomeranian. They are usually confident, outgoing characters which again are traits both their parent breeds are known to be, but some Pomskies are more outgoing than others which is where early socialisation comes into its own because it helps a more nervous puppy accept things they would have shied away from.

Some Pomskies also inherit the "protective and guarding" instincts of the Pomeranian, whereas others are a little more laid back. If a Pomsky shows a little too much of the "protective" side to their nature, it's best to gently curb this when a dog is still young to avoid problems later on. Leaving things too late can make it harder to stop a dog from guarding things unnecessarily which includes their feed bowls, toys and even the kids.

On the whole as long as a Pomsky is well socialised from a young enough age and their training starts early and is consistent, these charming little dogs are a pleasure and great fun to have around which is why over the last 20 years or so they have remained one of the most popular cross breeds to appear on the scene.


Intelligence / Trainability

Pomskies have inherited the intelligence of both their parent breeds. The Pomeranian being among the highest ranked breed when it comes to intelligence and the Husky being not that far behind. However, as with a lot of cross breeds and pedigree dogs, some Pomskies are smarter than others. Because they are so eager to please, these charming dogs are quick when it comes to learning new things, but this means they are quick to pick up bad behaviours too.

When it comes to training a Pomsky, they may have inherited a lot of intelligence from both parent breeds, but they can also inherit a stubborn streak too. As such, early socialisation is essential, but the same can be said for their training. Puppies need to be taught the "basics" from the word go and their training has to begin in earnest as soon as they have been fully vaccinated. Enrolling a Pomsky into puppy classes is a very good idea because not only will they be taught how to behave, but they will get to meet lots of new people and other dogs which will stand both owner and dog in good stead later on.

Pomskies need to know their place in the pack and who they can look to for direction and guidance for them to be truly happy, well-rounded and better behaved dogs. If they don't know who is alpha dog in a household, they can quickly start to show a more dominant side to their nature. This can result in a Pomsky taking on the role of alpha dog making them that much harder to handle and live with. 


Children and Other Pets

Pomskies love being in a family environment and revel in being included in everything that goes on around them. This includes playing lots of interactive games with the kids. However, because they can become a little over protective of their possessions which includes "their" children, care has to be taken when dogs play with them and more especially when the kids have friends over. As such any interaction between children and a dog should always be supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too boisterous.

They are known to be social dogs by nature and as such, Pomskies usually get on with other dogs they meet. If they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they generally get on well together, but this is not to say a Pomsky would not take great delight in chasing off the neighbour's cat whenever they get the chance. Care has to be taken when they are around smaller animals and pets, just in case.

For further advice please read our article on Keeping Children Safe around Dogs.


Health

The average life expectancy of a Pomsky is between 13 and 15 years when properly cared for and fed an appropriate good quality diet to suit their ages.

The Pomsky is known to suffer from a few hereditary health issues that affect their parent breeds, but because they are such a young cross breed more time would need to pass to really know what to what extent they are affected by hereditary disorders. With this said, the conditions that seem to affect the breed the most include the following:

  • Cataracts and other eye disorders
  • Skin issues
  • Allergies

Caring for a Pomsky

As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives. 


Grooming

More often than not, a Pomsky has a fluffy, soft coat and they shed quite a lot which is especially true during the Spring time and then again during the Autumn. As such, they are quite high maintenance on the grooming front with more time needing to be spent on their coats when they shed the most. Ideally a daily brush removes all dead and loose hair and keeps a dog's skin in good condition. It’s important for puppies to be introduced to all the tools needed to keep their coats looking good and to make sure a grooming session is always a nice experience for them.

They also need to visit a grooming parlour several times a year and more especially when a Pomsky blows their coats. Having a dog professionally groomed can makes it that much easier to keep things tidy in between visits to a parlour. It's also important to check a dog's ears on a regular basis and to clean them when necessary. If too much wax is allowed to build up in a dog's ears, it can lead to a painful infection which can be hard to clear up. In short, prevention is often easier than cure when it comes to ear infections.


Exercise

Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they have to be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.

A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing has to be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

With this said, Pomsky puppies should not be over exercised because their joints and bones are still growing. This includes not letting a dog jump up and down from furniture or going up or down the stairs. Too much pressure placed on their joints and spines at an early age could result in a dog developing painful problems later in their lives.


Feeding

If you get a Pomsky puppy from a breeder, they would give you a feeding schedule and it's important to stick to the same routine, feeding the same puppy food to avoid any tummy upsets. You can change a puppy's diet, but this needs to be done very gradually always making sure they don't develop any digestive upsets and if they do, it's best to put them back on their original diet and to discuss things with the vet before attempting to change it again.

Older dogs are not known to be fussy or finicky eaters, but this does not mean you can feed them a lower quality diet. It's best to feed a mature dog twice a day, once in the morning and then again in the evening, making sure it's good quality food that meets all their nutritional requirements. It's also important that dogs be given the right amount of exercise so they burn off any excess calories or they might gain too much weight which can lead to all sorts of health issues. Obesity can shorten a dog's life by several years so it's important to keep an eye on their waistline from the word go.


Average Cost to keep/care for a Pomsky

If you are looking to buy a Pomsky, you may need to register your interest with a breeder and go on a waiting list because puppies are rare. You would need to pay anything from £1000 upwards for a well-bred puppy. The cost of insuring a male 3-year-old Pomsky in northern England would be £17.79 a month for basic cover but for a lifetime policy, this would set you back £41.22 a month (quote as of June 2016). When insurance companies calculate a pet's premium, they factor in several things which includes where you live in the UK, a dog's age and whether or not they have been neutered or spayed among other things.

When it comes to food costs, you need to buy the best quality food whether wet or dry, to feed your dog making sure it suits the different stages of their lives. This would set you back between £20 - £30 a month. On top of all of this, you would need to factor in veterinary costs if you want to share your home with a Pomsky and this includes their initial vaccinations, their annual boosters, the cost of neutering or spaying a dog when the time is right and their yearly health checks, all of which quickly adds up to over £800 a year.

As a rough guide, the average cost to keep and care for a Pomsky would be between £50 to £80 a month depending on the level of insurance cover you opt to buy for your dog, but this does not include the initial cost of buying a pedigree or other puppy.


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