Eurasier


Contents

Key Breed Facts
Breed Characteristics
Introduction
History
Appearance
Temperament
Intelligence / Trainability
Children and Other Pets
Health
Caring for a Eurasier
Grooming
Exercise
Feeding
Average Cost to keep/care for a Eurasier


Key Breed Facts


Popularity #156 out of 238 Dog Breeds.


The Eurasier breed is also commonly known by the names Eurasian, Eurasian Dog.
Lifespan
11 - 13 years
Pedigree Breed ?
Yes - KC Recognised in the Utility Group
Height
Males 52 - 60 cm
Females 48 - 56 cm at the withers
Weight
Males 23 - 32 kg
Females 18 - 26 kg
Average Price (More Info)
£870 for KC Registered
£842 for Non KC Registered

Breed Characteristics



Introduction

The Eurasier is a medium sized, Spitz type dog that's often referred to as a Eurasian. The breed originates from Germany where they were first bred in the 1960's by Julius Wipfel who wanted to combine the characteristics of the Chow Chow with the Wolf Spitz. Over the years, these attractive dogs have earned themselves the reputation for being calm and even tempered. They are also known to form strong bonds with their families which is why they have remained a popular choice both as a companion dog and family pet in their native Germany. With this said, the Eurasier is still relatively unknown here in the UK although the breed is now gaining a little recognition albeit slowly.


History

The Eurasier is a relatively new breed having only been developed in Germany during the 1960's. A breeder by the name of Julius Whipfel bred the first of these dogs wanting to combine the characteristics of the Chow Chow with the German Wolf Spitz. The first dogs were known as "Wolf-Chows". A few years later the Samoyed was introduced into the mix to produce the dogs we see today.

Although Julius Whipfel is credited for being the founding breeder, there are those who believe the Eurasier to be a regeneration of the Laika, an ancient Russian breed and a dog that lived with tribes in Central Siberia. However, it is known that his dogs inherited their traits from their parent breeds and as such they have wedge-shaped heads with striking almond-shaped eyes paired to a gentle and affectionate nature.

The breed was renamed the Euraiser and finally recognised in the 1970's by the FCI and later they were accepted as a pure breed by The Kennel Club here in the UK. Today, these charming dogs are gaining popularity outside of their native Germany, thanks to their attractive looks and kind, gentle and loyal natures.


Appearance

Height at the withers: Males 52 - 60 cm, Females 48 - 56 cm

Average weight: Males 23 - 32 kg, Females 18 - 26 kg

The charming Eurasier has inherited many of their parent breed traits, both physical and temperament-wise. They boast having the striking almond-shaped eyes and the wedge-shaped head of the Spitz paired to a charming, gentle and affectionate nature of both parent breeds. Their heads are quite wide with dogs having a distinct furrow at the front of their faces and together with a nicely defined occiput (back of their heads) it adds to their quite charming looks. They only have a very slight stop and their muzzles taper gently with dogs having a medium sized black nose.

Their eyes are oval shaped, dark in colour and slanting with black pigmented rims. Ears are triangular and medium in size with the tips being slightly rounded. Dogs carry their ears pricked and they are set nicely apart on their heads. The Eurasier has a strong jaw with a perfect scissor bite where their upper teeth neatly overlap their lower ones. Their necks are set well and muscular being moderately long. Forequarters are muscular with a moderate amount of bone with dogs having strong, straight front legs and slightly sloping shoulders.

The Eurasier has a compact, well-muscled body with firm, well-defined withers, straight backs and a nice width to their loin. Their croup is level, strong and broad with dogs boasting an oval shaped ribcage that reaches down to their elbows. Their forechests are well developed and bellies slightly tucked up which adds to a dog's athletic appearance. Their back legs are straight, strong with dogs having well-muscled upper and lower thighs.

Feet are oval shaped with tight, nicely arched toes and well cushioned firm black paw pads that have thick hair in between them. Their nails are strong and dark in colour. Tails are set high being firm and round with a good amount of thickness, but this tapers to the tip. Dogs carry their tails forward whether it's curved or curled over their backs. Some dogs carry their tail forward and to one side. When relaxed, an Eurasier lets their tail hang down, but they always carry it up and curled when excited or alert.

When it comes to their coat, the Eurasier boasts having a double coat that consists of a harsh topcoat that's moderate in length and which lies loosely to a dog's body and a much thicker, softer undercoat. The hair on a dog's muzzle, face, ears and on the front of their legs is shorter. However, the hair on their tails and on the backs of their legs are nicely feathered with much longer hair. It's also longer around a dog's neck which forms their distinctive mane. Accepted breed colours are as follows:

  • Black
  • Black and tan
  • Cream with black face mask
  • Fawn
  • Fawn and black
  • Grey
  • Red
  • Red and black
  • Red with black face mask
  • Red fawn
  • Red sable
  • Sable

Temperament

The Eurasier thrives on human contact and become totally devoted to their families. They seem to have a real affinity with children and love to be involved in everything that goes on in a household. They are incredibly loyal to the people they love which is just one of the reasons they make such great family pets. However, because they are so smart, it's essential for their training to start as early as possible and for it to be consistent throughout their lives. This helps a dog understand what is expected of them.

Early socialisation is also very important and the sooner an Eurasier is introduced to as many new situations, noises, people, animals and other pets the better. It will help them adjust and accept everything they encounter later in their lives without feeling stressed out in any way. With this said, Eurasiers tend to be naturally wary of anyone they first meet, although they would never show any sort of aggressive behaviour towards a stranger, preferring to just keep their distance and let their owners know they are not happy about something.

They are sensitive dogs by nature and as such they do not answer well to any sort of harsh correction or heavy handed training methods. They do respond well to positive reinforcement which brings out the best in an Eurasier. They are very good choice of family dogs in households where at least one person remains at home when everyone else is out of the house because they thrive on human contact and don't do well when they are left on their own for any length of time.

If left to their own devices and not given enough exercise and mental stimulation on a daily basis, an Eurasier is very likely to develop separation anxiety which can lead to all sorts of behavioural. This includes dogs becoming depressed and withdrawn or at the other end of the scale, they may well start being destructive around the home and barking incessantly causing problems with neighbours.


Intelligence / Trainability

Eurasiers are intelligent dogs and the fact they love to please, makes them easy to train. They love the one-to-one contact they are given during a training session which is why they are such a great choice for first time owners who love nothing more than to spend as much time in the great outdoors with an active, alert and loyal canine companion. However, anyone hoping to share a home with an Eurasier should be prepared to spend a lot of time taking care of their dog's coat because the grooming needs of these attractive characters are very high.


Children and Other Pets

The Eurasier is known to be good with children and they like nothing more than to be around them playing interactive games. However, as with any other dog, it's important for any interaction between children and an Eurasier to be supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too boisterous which could end up with a child getting frightened or hurt.

When well socialised, Eurasiers generally get on with other dogs they meet thanks to their kind and social natures. They also get on with a family cat they have grown up with, however, care has to be taken when they are around other small pets and cats they don't know, just in case.

For further advice please read our article on Keeping Children Safe around Dogs.


Eurasier Health

The average life expectancy of a Eurasier is between 11 and 13 years when properly cared for and fed an appropriate good quality diet to suit their ages.

The Eurasier, unlike many other pure breeds does not suffer from the hereditary health issues so often seen in other pedigree dogs. However, there is one condition that seems to affect the breed the most which is as follows:

  • Entropion - a painful eye condition that needs veterinary attention

Caring for a Eurasier

As with any other breed, Eurasiers need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.


Grooming

The Eurasier has a thick, double medium length coat that stands off the body much like other Sptiz-type dogs. As such they are high maintenance in the grooming department. Ideally, their coats to be brushed daily to prevent any matts or tangles from forming and to remove any dead hair. They shed their coats throughout the year, only more so during the Spring and then again in the Autumn when more frequent grooming is generally necessary to keep on top of things.

Eurasiers also need to be professionally groomed several times a year which makes keeping their coats tidier and in good condition that much easier in between visits to a grooming parlour. Because these charming dogs are known to suffer from an eye disorder called entropion, it's crucial for their eyes to be checked on a regular basis so that if a problem is brewing, it can be caught in its early stages before things become too uncomfortable and painful for a dog to have to cope with. The earlier an eye condition is treated, the better the chances of it clearing up quickly.

It's also important to check a dog's ears on a regular basis and to clean them when necessary. If too much wax is allowed to build up in a dog's ears, it can lead to a painful infection which can be hard to clear up. In short, prevention is often easier than cure when it comes to ear infections.


Exercise

The Eurasier is a lively, energetic and intelligent little dog and as such they need to be given the right amount of daily exercise and mental stimulation to be truly happy, well-balanced and obedient dogs. They need at least one hour's exercise every day, and more if possible to prevent a dog from getting bored which could lead to them developing some unwanted behavioural issues which includes separation anxiety.

A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing has to be extremely secure to keep these lively and alert dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

With this said, Eurasier puppies should not be over exercised because their joints and bones are still growing and too much pressure on them could result in causing a dog a few problems later on in their lives. They should not be allowed to jump up or off furniture nor should they be allowed to run up and down the stairs for this very reason.


Feeding

The Eurasier is a lively, energetic and intelligent little dog and as such they need to be given the right amount of daily exercise and mental stimulation to be truly happy, well-balanced and obedient dogs. They need at least one hour's exercise every day, and more if possible to prevent a dog from getting bored which could lead to them developing some unwanted behavioural issues which includes separation anxiety.

A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing has to be extremely secure to keep these lively and alert dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

With this said, Eurasier puppies should not be over exercised because their joints and bones are still growing and too much pressure on them could result in causing a dog a few problems later on in their lives. They should not be allowed to jump up or off furniture nor should they be allowed to run up and down the stairs for this very reason.


Average Cost to keep/care for a Eurasier

If you are looking to buy an Eurasier, you may have to go on a breeder's waiting list because not many puppies are registered with the Kennel Club every year. You would need to pay anything from £700 to over £1000 for a well-bred pedigree puppy. The cost of insuring a male 3-year-old Eurasier in northern England would be £19.20 a month for basic cover but for a lifetime policy, this would set you back £41.22 a month (quote as of June 2016). When insurance companies calculate a pet's premium, they factor in several things which includes where you live in the UK and a dog's age and whether or not they have been neutered or spayed.

When it comes to food costs, you need to buy the best quality food whether wet or dry, to feed your dog throughout their lives making sure it suits the different stages of their lives. This would set you back between £40 - £50 a month. On top of all of this, you would need to factor in veterinary costs if you want to share your home with an Eurasier and this includes their initial vaccinations, their annual boosters, the cost of neutering or spaying your dog when the time is right and their yearly health checks, all of which quickly adds up to over £1000 a year.

As a rough guide, the average cost to keep and care for an Eurasier would be between £70 to £100 a month depending on the level of insurance cover you opt to buy for your dog, but this does not include the initial cost of buying a pedigree puppy.


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